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Screening Colonoscopy Program

Colonoscopy is considered the most effective method of screening for colorectal cancer. Beginning at age 50, all men and women should be screened for colorectal cancer, even if they are experiencing no problems or symptoms, and have a full colonoscopy every ten years.

To accommodate healthy patients who need a screening colonoscopy, Stony Brook University Cancer Center has established a direct access program to expedite and simplify the process of scheduling colonoscopies. The Screening Colonoscopy Program allows select patients in stable health to arrange for a colonoscopy without first having a face-to-face consultation with a gastrointestinal specialist.

To participate in the Screening Colonoscopy Program, speak with your primary care physician who will determine if you meet the criteria. If you are eligible, your primary care physician will then send the information needed to initiate your screening to the program coordinator who will contact you directly to discuss your medical history and go over the details of the procedure, including medication, dietary, and preparation issues. Or, you can fill out the form and a staff member from Stony Brook will contact you.

CALL:
(631) 444-COLON (444-2656) 

ONLINE:
Request Your Screening Colonoscopy

Details about Your Colonoscopy
An appointment for your procedure will then be scheduled for a date and time suitable for you. The procedure itself typically takes less than 30 minutes. Please note that you will receive sedation for your colonoscopy. After receiving sedation, you will not be allowed to drive, work, or operate machinery for 12 hours. After that time period, you may resume your normal activities.

Instructions for Your Colonoscopy
Your doctor and nurse will explain in detail how you will prepare for your colonoscopy. The followoing forms have important information for you. Please fill out the forms and follow the instructions for bringing them to your appointments.

Colonoscopy Preparation Instructions:

Learn More about Colon Cancer and the Importance of a Colonoscopy
Ask the Expert: Chris Lascarides, MD, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 

What You Need to Know About Virtual Colonoscopy
Ask the Expert: Matthew Barish, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Radiology